[PDF] Ý Free Download ↠ Rewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology : by James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Pat Cadigan Greg Egan Paolo Bacigalupi Paul Di Filippo Elizabeth Bear David Marusek Ã

By James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Pat Cadigan Greg Egan Paolo Bacigalupi Paul Di Filippo Elizabeth Bear David Marusek | Comments: ( 689 ) | Date: ( Oct 23, 2019 )

Following the rapid evolution of cyberpunk from Bruce Sterling and William Gibson into the current millennium, this vivid anthology welcomes a new generation of exciting writers to take the genre in new and unexpected directions Cyberpunk freewheels with punk rock energy, careening between the internet, bioengineering, and international politics, its influence saturatingFollowing the rapid evolution of cyberpunk from Bruce Sterling and William Gibson into the current millennium, this vivid anthology welcomes a new generation of exciting writers to take the genre in new and unexpected directions Cyberpunk freewheels with punk rock energy, careening between the internet, bioengineering, and international politics, its influence saturating entertainment and the mass media Drawing on the traditions of the pioneering cyberpunk manifesto, Mirrorshades, each story delves into the gritty world of technological change Legendary Mirrorshades editor and contributor Bruce Sterling is back, alongside such cutting edge writers as Cory Doctorow, Jonathan Lethem, Gwyneth Jones, Hal Duncan, Charles Stross, and Pat Cadigan With a daring introduction from James Patrick Kelly and John Kessel, editors of the controversial Feeling Very Strange The Slipstream Anthology, this collection is an exhilarating snapshot of a vibrant literary movement.Contents Introduction Hacking Cyberpunk by James Patrick Kelly and John Kessel Bicycle Repairman by Bruce Sterling Lobsters by Charles Stross The Voluntary State by Christopher Rowe When Sysadmins Rules the Earth by Cory Doctorow The Wedding Album by David Marusek Two Dreams on Trains by Elizabeth Bear Yeyuka by Greg Egan Red Sonja and Lessingham in Dreamland by Gwyneth JonesSterling Kessel Correspondence How We Got in Town and out Again by Jonathan Lethem Search Engine by Mary Rosenblum The Dog Said Bow Wow by Michael Swanwick The Calorie Man By Paolo Bagciaglupi The Final Remake of The Return of Little Latin Larry With a Completely Remastered Soundtrack by Pat Cadigan What s Up Tiger Lily by Paul Di Filippo Daddy s World by Walter Jon Williams Thirteen Views of a Cardboard City by William Gibson


  • Title: Rewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology
  • Author: James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Pat Cadigan Greg Egan Paolo Bacigalupi Paul Di Filippo Elizabeth Bear David Marusek
  • ISBN: 9781892391537
  • Page: 179
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Pat Cadigan Greg Egan Paolo Bacigalupi Paul Di Filippo Elizabeth Bear David Marusek

James Patrick Kelly please, call him Jim has had an eclectic writing career He has written novels, short stories, essays, reviews, poetry, plays and planetarium shows His short novel Burn won the Science Fiction Writers of America s Nebula Award in 2007 He has won the World Science Fiction Society s Hugo Award twice in 1996, for his novelette Think Like A Dinosaur and in 2000, for his novelette, Ten to the Sixteenth to One His fiction has been translated into eighteen languages He produces two podcasts James Patrick Kelly s StoryPod on Audible and the Free Reads Podcast Yes, it s free His most recent publishing venture is the ezine James Patrick Kelly s Strangeways His website is jimkelly.



Comments Rewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology

  • Brainycat

    This anthology is put together by James Patrick Kelly and John Kessel. Sadly, I cannot recall reading any of their work but I shall endeavor to remedy that situation shortly.The introduction is very well done, in that "let's spend a lot of time trying to define common definitions so we can disagree about nuance" sort of way. I got a feeling they were desperately casting around for a singularity (a recurrent theme in the collection) to define a point in SF history where cyberpunk (CP) gave up the [...]


  • Alan

    I am impatient with movements and manifestoes, even when they seem to make sense. So ignore the bombastic subtitle of this anthology; ignore the assertions about cyberpunk and about its anointed successor, as laid out here and just look at the list of authors included. Every single one is a powerhouse of recent SF. Every single story in this book is powerful, both as extrapolation (even when fanciful or inaccurate) and as literature. Some, like Bruce Sterling's "Bicycle Repairman," Charles Stros [...]


  • Peter

    Cyberpunk was a subgenre of science fiction that hit big in the 80s and faded out, not to nothingness, but becoming rarer as some of the ideas became more used in the mainstream, were you often had to deliberately set out to echo most of the cliches of cyberpunk if you wanted to write a story that could be described as such. This is an anthology of stories that are 'postcyberpunk', a subgenre that's a lot harder to define. Especially around the borders, a lot of postcyberpunk stories resemble cy [...]


  • Tarfein

    Jak ohodnotit celkově povídkovou sbírku? Jedině snad povídku po povídce.Z celého sborníku se mi nejvíc líbil "Opravář kol" a "Haf haf, řekl pes", možná pro jejich humor, a "Jejuka" a "Kalorik", možná pro svůj alespoň trochu optimistický konec. Nejsem přesvědčený, že by kyberpunk musel nezbytně končit vždy negativně, přesto jsme v Singularitě svědky především toho. Zejména "Svatební album", jakkoliv může pro protagonisty končit příznivě, na mě zanechalo [...]


  • Fraser Simons

    This collection of short fiction curated for post-cyberpunk fiction is very well curated. Though some of the stories weren't my jam, I could tell why they were there because with each selection of short fiction there is a correspondence between two people talking about the genre. Interspersed throughout are quotes from some cyberpunk heavy hitters we know today. Just so, lots off the short fiction are from the same people. Gibson, Sterling, Stross, Bacigalupi, Doctorow, loads of people on most p [...]


  • Lee Chrimes

    Another 'cyberpunk' collection that purposefully stretches the definition of the term, focusing more on the 'punk' element to bring together a jumble of stories that have a hand in a huge range of genres. In a way, that's all still cyberpunk - fusing conflicting ideas, adding a dash of near future paranoia and seeing what settles when you tear the pages up and throw them in the air.Plenty of the big names past and present contribute stories - Sterling, Doctorow, Gibson, Cadigan - and the resulti [...]


  • Andy Smith

    My experience with most anthologies is that they're pretty hit and miss, and for me this was no exception, but there was enough hit here to make the overall experience good and introduce me to some new authors.Stories I particularly enjoyed:“Bicycle Repairman” by Bruce Sterling“Lobsters” by Charles Stross (but had already read it elsewhere)“Yeyuka” by Greg Egan“Search Engine” by Mary Rosenblum“The Calorie Man” By Paolo Bagciaglupi (but had already read it elsewhere)“The Fin [...]


  • Marc

    I love the idea of post-cyberpunk and thoroughly enjoyed the introduction and editorial commentary throughout. This is one of the most even short story anthologies I’ve ever read. Not a dud in the bunch!


  • Russell

    Nifty collection of later Cyberpunk from the mid-nineties to the mid- double aughts. Most of the usual suspects are in the collection. Of interest, is that two of the stories are set in New Orleans, and two others are set in Tennessee. It is easy to see the Big Easy as a dystopian playground.


  • Alex Rogers

    Very poor anthology, with much jerkery and pontification in between a very uneven set of stories. I'd have given it 1 star, but there are some gems amongst the dross and drivel.


  • Planet of the Books www.planetofthebooks.com

    What is cyberpunk? Is it a pseudo-movement populated solely by the work of William Gibson? Or perhaps it is the broad shift in sci-fi consciousness that ultimately gave birth to everything from Blade Runner and the Matrix to Akira and Ghost in the Shell? Irregardless of the academic debate over the role and reality of the cyberpunk movement, cyberpunk is established in the popular mind as the change in science fiction to a darker, more uncertain future populated by social outcasts living in grit [...]


  • Roman

    Some good stories in this collection, a few really good ones and no spectacular flops. I was particularly surprised by Cory Doctorow's contribution 'When Sysadmins Ruled The World', the last story in the book, which packed an emotional punch I wasn't expecting as I had pretty much written Doctorow off as a fiction writer. If he can write other stuff of a similarly high caliber I may have to update that opinion. This volume of stories is an excellent introduction to post-cyberpunk writing and eve [...]


  • Kenny

    This is a mixed bag with less good stories than mediocre ones and few great ones. If you're intrigued by the concept of "Post-Cyberpunk" I suggest reading "The Wedding Album," "Search Engine" and "Calorie Man" and stopping there. These three stories actually have characters who are interesting and plot lines that go somewhere. The rest do not contain these important elements. "Lobsters" is a total mess and the last story is hardly PCP and will leave such a bad taste in your mouth. I'm sure there [...]


  • Tomislav

    Cyberpunk was first a 1990s movement within the science fiction genre that emphasized information technology in the hands of the marginal segments of society. It spread rapidly throughout the genre, competing with the "humanist" school, and eventually became a stylistic trend in society at large, influencing music, movies, and the early internet. This anthology does not capture any such thing as a Post-Cyberpunk movement, but just the more simple meaning of the words - writing that came after Cy [...]


  • Stoyan

    The definitive cyberpunk collection if you want to follow the evolution of the sub genre or a comprehensive almanach if you just want to get acquainted with it.


  • David

    I'm giving this book four stars just because of some true gems contained within it, even though I was thinking of giving it just three stars. I just decided to focus on the positive and what I liked about it.First of all, I have to say that the book really started for me in the sixth tale, "Thirteen Views Of a Cardboard City" by William Gibson, something really unique, like clinical descriptions of post-modern still life cityscapes, without characters, just objects -- it's something you need to [...]


  • Dana

    Having now read both the steampunk and post-cyberpunk anthologies by this publisher, I have to say that I am definitely more of a PCP fan. Aside from enjoying the stories in this anthology more, I also really liked the excerpts of the Sterling-Kessel "state of cyberpunk" letter series that were incorporated throughout. I very much admit to being a nerd, but I liked those explanatory aspects by the editors of both anthologies that tried to give the reader some understanding of the development of [...]


  • TomF

    Decent collection of 'post cyberpunk' short stories (if you can get past some of the horrendous pretension by the editors & dueling authors who book-end the stories). Think what wins it is that these ageing cyber-freaks have brought more family, love & emotional loss to their coded-chrome dreams & jaded dystopias. There's a couple of misses and tame offerings in there, but some real class acts too. 'The Wedding Album' sees AI-constructs of favourite moments as the new wedding pic, an [...]


  • James

    Some good stories in this one, but the commentary (made up of correspondence between the editor and Bruce Sterling) wasn't particularly revealing.The better stories:The Calorie Man - The story taking place in world crippled by a fossil fuel collapse in the grip of a cartel of biotech companies.Daddy's World - A touching story of an uploaded brain who hates the lie that he's still just a boy.Yekyuka - A man confronted with a horrible illness in the third world during a stint with charity. He's pr [...]


  • K. Axel

    I have yet to read all the stories in this book, but I'll try to review them as I read them. Also, this anthology includes a discussion of cyberpunk between Bruce Sterling and the editor, John Kessel.Bicycle Repairman by Bruce Sterling. This story features an ordinary bicycle repairman, obviously. His life is boring to say the least, but then he receives a package one day, a package meant for an old friend of his. This start off events that end up changing Lyle's life. Not the best story, a litt [...]


  • Keri

    Kelly and Kessel share the wave of writers styled after the fabled Cyberpunk era, labeling them Post-Cyberpunk. The stories in here are from some of the original members (Gibson, Sterling) as well as some new faces. Added on (as a bonus!) is the correspondence between Bruce Sterling and John Kessel about the very idea of Cyberpunk.As for the stories, I enjoyed many of them, especially Sterling's "Bicycle Repairman" where the dark ninja is beaten by a repairman. Or "Lobsters" by Charles Stross, w [...]


  • Modi123

    Over all I wasn't impressed by the collection of stories presented. I found the thesis interesting in that it was trying to create this 'post cyberpunk' divide, but honestly the collection could have been just labeled generic scifi. I do not believe I am sold on this new sub-genre scheme, but, if I was, I may have found a better connection or thread through all the tales. Stross's "Lobersters" and Doctorow's "When Sysadmins Ruled the Earth" stand out as notably solid stories; the former I read b [...]


  • Michael Burnam-Fink

    Rewired is a self-conscious anthology of early 21st century science fiction. Kelly and Kessel want to put the very best stories on display-and they succeed with 16 excellent stories including pioneers like Gibson, Sterling, and Cadigan, and rising talents like Stross and Bacigalupi. The stories are all smart, provocative, well written. Virtual realities dominate as a technological theme, but the personal moves are way more diverse, and the stories that get away from computers are all the better [...]


  • Devin

    This collection of "Post-Cyberpunk Stories" is a bit of a mixed bag. Some excellent story telling mixed in with some painfully dated writing. It doesn't have the same spark that made _Mirrorshades_ such a compelling read back when Cyberpunk was just emerging as a movement. But the good stories in this collection are enough to make one glad that there are serious writers that have given the genre a much needed dose of maturity.


  • Jim O'Loughlin

    This is a really helpful overview of a lot of contemporary SF writers (though post-cyberpunk is kind of a ridiculous term to be using). It was an anthology, so you have to expect the stories will range from the amazing to the lame. Some of the best stories were frontloaded in the collection (Jonathan Lethem, Gwyneth Jones, Greg Egan) but don't miss the one by Paolo Bacigalupi, "The Calorie Man." That was good enough that I started reading his novel, The Windup Girl.


  • George

    I'm halfway through this book & unfortunately it doesn't seem to live up to its potential. I've been distracted by The Tales of Dying Earth - and I think I'll take a break from Rewired for a while. Maybe I can generate some enthusiasm for it after a short separation. UPDATE: I tried to re-start today (January 28th, 2009, but couldn't. This book just doesn't do it for me. I'll put it back on the shelf and give it another try when I run out of things to read.


  • Craig Todd

    A little over half the short stories in this collection were good, the others seemed to try too hard, approaching pretentiousness, pushing an idea which was too small for even a short story or, at least, an interesting short story. Sterling, Stross, Doctorow, Egan, Bear, Swanwick, Di Filippo, Gibson, and Williams, were fairly solid tales. The Cadigan story was Ok, but it could be the oddest piece I have read by her. The rest were too flashy, in a shallow way, without any real substance.


  • Christian

    This is a must-read anthology for (post-)cyberpunk fans. There are some real gems in the stories that make it well worth the read and they are all generally strong. It doesn't quite reach 5 starts because there are a few that just not hit it right. The editors introduction is indispensable and the story intros are insightful. Add to that the excerpts from Sterling's and Kessel's correspondence through the years and you see what whipping up an anthology is really about.


  • Alethea

    As with most anthologies, this is a mix of stories I rather enjoyed (Daddy's World), so-so stories (The Dog Said Bow-Wow) stories I'd read before and didn't like any better this time around (The Wedding Album), and the obligatory WTF/ugh (amusingly, this time by William Gibson, progenitor of Cyberpunk.)


  • Annalise

    Bruce Sterling, "The Bicycle Repairman": I don't know which is worse, his characterization or his dialogue, but they're both symptoms of each other. ("HI I LIKE BIKES OH AND BY THE WAY HAVE SOME EXPOSITION!") It's made me appreciate Gibson's hand in The Difference Engine all the more (not to say that I liked the book, but now I realize how much worse it could have been).


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  • [PDF] Ý Free Download ↠ Rewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology : by James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Pat Cadigan Greg Egan Paolo Bacigalupi Paul Di Filippo Elizabeth Bear David Marusek Ã
    179 James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Pat Cadigan Greg Egan Paolo Bacigalupi Paul Di Filippo Elizabeth Bear David Marusek
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    Posted by:James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Pat Cadigan Greg Egan Paolo Bacigalupi Paul Di Filippo Elizabeth Bear David Marusek
    Published :2019-07-14T19:05:34+00:00