[PDF] Download ✓ A History of Horror | by Þ Wheeler Winston Dixon

By Wheeler Winston Dixon | Comments: ( 459 ) | Date: ( Nov 21, 2019 )

Ever since horror leapt from popular fiction to the silver screen in the late 1890s, viewers have experienced fear and pleasure in exquisite combination Wheeler Winston Dixon s A History of Horror is the only book to offer a comprehensive survey of this ever popular film genre.Arranged by decades, with outliers and franchise films overlapping some years, this one stop souEver since horror leapt from popular fiction to the silver screen in the late 1890s, viewers have experienced fear and pleasure in exquisite combination Wheeler Winston Dixon s A History of Horror is the only book to offer a comprehensive survey of this ever popular film genre.Arranged by decades, with outliers and franchise films overlapping some years, this one stop sourcebook unearths the historical origins of characters such as Dracula, Frankenstein, and the Wolfman and their various incarnations in film from the silent era to comedic sequels A History of Horror explores how the horror film fits into the Hollywood studio system and how its enormous success in American and European culture expanded globally over time.Dixon examines key periods in the horror film in which the basic precepts of the genre were established, then banished into conveniently reliable and malleable forms, and then, after collapsing into parody, rose again and again to create new levels of intensity and menace A History of Horror, supported by rare stills from classic films, brings over fifty timeless horror films into frightfully clear focus, zooms in on today s top horror Web sites, and champions the stars, directors, and subgenres that make the horror film so exciting and popular with contemporary audiences.


  • Title: A History of Horror
  • Author: Wheeler Winston Dixon
  • ISBN: 9780813547961
  • Page: 393
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

Wheeler Winston Dixon

Wheeler Winston Dixon is an American filmmaker, scholar and author, and an expert on film history, theory and criticism.His scholarship has particular emphasis on Fran ois Truffaut, Jean Luc Godard, American experimental cinema and horror films He has written extensively on numerous aspects of film, including his books A Short History of Film and A History of Horror From 1999 through the end of 2014, he was co editor of the Quarterly Review of Film and Video He is regarded as a top reviewer of films In addition, he is notable as an experimental American filmmaker with films made over several decades, and the Museum of Modern Art exhibited his works in 2003 He has taught at a number of schools of higher learning.



Comments A History of Horror

  • Nandakishore Varma

    An excellent history of horror cinema (NOT fiction) from the turn of the last century to 2010. It's a very easy read, and enjoyable to a horror aficionado such as I. The book does not have any in-depth analysis of how horror works: basically, it traces the evolution of the horror film from the silent movie era to the present. It touches upon almost all the famous producers, directors, and icons (such as Lon Chaney, Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, Vincent Price, Christopher Lee et al); and basically [...]


  • Arthur O'dell

    A decent read, expecially for those with little to no background in film history. Dixon's chapters on the horror film to 1970 don't really add anything to what has been written elsewhere, and the two last chapters provide a useful summary of major films, especially foreign-language films. The book's main weakness is that it does not employ a consistent approach to its subject; Dixon jumps between a chronological and a topical approach that can be confusing if you are not already familiar with ma [...]


  • Michael

    The early sections of the book covering classic horror up until the 70's are great. Well written, and including a lot of titles I want to follow up on. The later sections were not nearly as strong. Chronology gets really jumpy, the writing feels a little lazier (lots of run-ons), and there are mistakes (for instance, Land of the Dead is not the most recent Romero zombie film [the book was released in 2010] There have been two since then.) Dixon's horror tastes are solid, though. Beyond his enjoy [...]


  • Spencer Howerton

    A must-read for film fans.


  • Roni

    Very interesting in depth analysis of the history of the horror film genre. I read this originally for a film analysis class, but I really enjoyed the read and the information that was included.


  • Trent Kartis

    Great book for film students.


  • Michael

    I will admit that I went into this book hoping for a more in depth discussion of various themes in horror cinema and how they related to what was happening in the world at the time. I can not fault the book for my incorrect assumptions. What the reader is presented with, instead, is a roughly chronological listing of horror titles with descriptions of the films and some commentary about their creation. This is a bit confusing, as many of the descriptions reveal the plot twists and endings of the [...]


  • Joel

    This is a reasonably complete list of horror movies that have been made, I'll give it that much. However, that really doesn't make it a history of horror so much as it makes it a catalog with random descriptions and, annoying, spoilers peppered throughout (such as the one about the reasonably recent movie The Orphan I'm more-or-less ok with spoiling a classic Universal horror movie that's over 80 years old but maybe not reveal the secret ending to the 5 year old movie). It felt like I was readin [...]


  • Eric

    WWD accomplishes what he sets out to do and his critical judgments of individual works strike me as pretty consistently on point. (He's more enthusiastic about SON OF DRACULA -- the Deep South sequel to DRACULA -- than seems necessary, but I'm perfectly willing to grant him Lon Chaney, Jr and Count Alucard.) The question is whether a quick, 200-page survey of horror (mostly movies, with some, mostly 19thC, literary works tossed in) is a sensible thing to do. In tripping along so quickly, WWD sac [...]


  • Steve Wiggins

    This is a brief summary of the horror film genre that manages to squeeze in a remarkable number of films. While some of the analysis is rather brief, and many of the films are from the non-English cinema world (as they should be), there is still much useful information here for someone wanting to learn about American horror films and their impact on viewers. My own personal viewing list grew with my reading of the book. Dixon does a particularly good job with the early days of the genre and ofte [...]


  • Erika Schoeps

    3.5 starsA fun, informative history of horror films. I really enjoyed this because instead of sounding like an overly pretentious thesis/analysis, the author simply gives you a basic overview. The author describes important and influential movies and narrates their impact on the film industry. This book is accessible and fun for literally anybody. Although this fun approach usually worked well, I sometimes wish the author would do a broader analysis of the time period and the cause and effect re [...]


  • Jill Hutchinson

    Ho humis book did not impress me but there were some interesting tidbits that kept it from getting a failing grade. The author traces the horror film from the beginning through 2009 which should be a fascinating read for the movie buff but right off the bat there were some mistakes about who starred in what film. That immediately put me off but I kept reading. Lots of films mentioned, lots of actors mentioned, lots of director mentioned why didn't it resonate with me? To be frank, I have no idea [...]


  • Ravis Harnell

    Basically a combination chronology/reference text for horror films, created with the die-hard horror fan rather than academia in mind. It covers just about everything about horror cinema from the creation of the motion picture up through '90s franchises and '00s torture porn, with plenty of digressions from English-speaking films to cover the contributions of writers, directors, actors and crew members from around the globe. Not exactly the most entertaining or easily digestible read, but hardco [...]


  • Joey

    A decent history that suffers hugely when it gets to genres and eras that the author doesn't like. The history lesson gets replaced by editorializing about violence and gore. Worse, when dealing with series the author doesn't like his research gets pretty sloppy. If I could do half stars It'd be 2.5, but I can't. HENCE 3.


  • Randi Kennedy

    Despite some distracting typos and some small errors in film descriptions (which can be forgiven, given the number of films discussed), I found this history if the horror genre to be well-written and very engaging. Recommended for the casual horror film fan who wants to learn more about the genre.


  • Mark

    The first half seems like an interminable reeling off of film titles with brief synopses as the book condenses the history of horror. Later on it is more expansive and reflective, with more interesting things to say about the genre. A good sketch of framework from which to further explore; also provides a lot of film suggestions to watch to fill any gaps in your horror CV.


  • Rae

    This is not so much a history as an annotated bibliography of horror films.


  • April

    Good workmanlike book retelling the history of the horror film genre. A general overview, nothing really in depth.


  • Aaron Hollander

    Informative, broad survey on the history of horror cinema.


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  • [PDF] Download ✓ A History of Horror | by Þ Wheeler Winston Dixon
    393 Wheeler Winston Dixon
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ✓ A History of Horror | by Þ Wheeler Winston Dixon
    Posted by:Wheeler Winston Dixon
    Published :2019-08-12T15:08:58+00:00