✓ The Living Shadow || ☆ PDF Read by á Walter B. Gibson Maxwell Grant

By Walter B. Gibson Maxwell Grant | Comments: ( 419 ) | Date: ( Nov 20, 2019 )

WHO KNOWS WHAT EVIL LURKS IN THE HEARTS OF MEN THE SHADOW KNOWS But no one knows THE SHADOW Cloaked in darkness and mystery, the man in black is a legend to those who have felt his remorseless hand The Underworld One step outside the law and many leagues ahead of the police in the battle against crime, he haunts the forbidding canyons of Manhattan with a mocking laughWHO KNOWS WHAT EVIL LURKS IN THE HEARTS OF MEN THE SHADOW KNOWS But no one knows THE SHADOW Cloaked in darkness and mystery, the man in black is a legend to those who have felt his remorseless hand The Underworld One step outside the law and many leagues ahead of the police in the battle against crime, he haunts the forbidding canyons of Manhattan with a mocking laugh that strikes terror into the souls of the guilty everywhere.With his invisible network of crimefighters who have pledged him their loyalty and their lives, THE SHADOW stalks a trial of blood that begins with a strange Chinese coin and ends with a king s ransom in jewels A fortune leading straight into the trap of a brilliant master criminal who has just pulled the job of a lifetime in another man s skin Has THE SHADOW met his match at last Originally published in The Shadow Magazine, Volume I, April June 1931.


  • Title: The Living Shadow
  • Author: Walter B. Gibson Maxwell Grant
  • ISBN: 9780515034783
  • Page: 285
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

Walter B. Gibson Maxwell Grant

Walter Brown Gibson September 12, 1897 December 6, 1985 was an American author and professional magician best known for his work on the pulp fiction character The Shadow Gibson, under the pen name Maxwell Grant, wrote than 300 novel length Shadow stories, writing up to 10,000 words a day to satisfy public demand during the character s golden age in the 1930s and 1940s.



Comments The Living Shadow

  • Mark

    The first Shadow novel as written by Walter Gibson under the alias of Maxwell Grant, he adopted the pen name Maxwell Grant, taking the name from two magic dealers he knew, Maxwell Holden and U.F. Grant.The Shadow was first heard on July 31, 1930, as the mysterious narrator of the Street and Smith radio program Detective Story Hour developed in an effort to boost sales of Detective Story Magazine. When listeners of the program began asking at newsstands for copies of the Shadow detective magazine [...]


  • Piotr

    Not bad, I guess. Frankly, I'm just trying to get through the first few books until The Shadow takes over. At this point in the series, a relative everyman Harry Vincent is the narrator and protagonist, with The Shadow stepping in as a plot driver and occasional deus ex machina. Apparently the series becomes more about The Shadow later.This was written in 1931 and frankly, it shows. Occasional references to technology, like a wireless radio and self-starting cars, are actually kind of cool. The [...]


  • Jeff

    The Shadow seems more like a subtle force of nature than man, seemingly appearing out of actual shadows and taking on many disguises. As pulp fiction, this is great stuff. Remember, though, that this was written in the early 1930s, so be prepared for some racial stereotypes of certain Chinese, and one African American, characters. But, if you can put that aside and chalk it up to the mindset of the times, this is a great, engaging and faced-paced story that will sweep you along.


  • Leothefox

    The first The Shadow tale is not a typical hero or superhero story. The Shadow himself is rarely seen and no hint of his identity is given, he's a mastermind, a mystery lurking in the shadows. Instead, the story follows Harry Vincent, a man The Shadow saves from suicide and recruits as his agent. Focus shifts also to various participants in the murder/theft mystery and to various intervening subjects who prove to be The Shadow in disguise. The Shadow is very much like Fantomas here, a mystery t [...]


  • Charles

    I don't know. Didn't care that much for it. I've never had the faintest urge to read another in the series. I much prefer the "Spider" books by Norvell Page.


  • Rubén Lorenzo

    La Sombra es un personaje peculiar que combate el crimen con la ayuda indispensable de un grupo inagotable de aliados. De hecho, el protagonista en sí apenas aparece en la novela, poco sabemos de él si exceptuamos su inquietante silueta y su desquiciante carcajada.Esta es la primera novela de una larga serie donde el misterio y el espionaje son cada vez más exagerados y sorprendentes. Notas codificadas, persecuciones silenciosas, robos y muertes sin resolver todo servido con un estilo directo [...]


  • Ian

    It’s a good introduction to the legendary pulp character. Harry Vincent, The Shadow’s newest agent, is the main character here, leaving The Shadow himself to be a cypher. He’s kept in the dark (literally, most of the time) as this mysterious figure beyond comprehension, which is how he must seem to his agents and the criminals he destroys. Through Harry we get hints about how he operates and what kind of adventures he gets into. The story itself is fairly standard- a murder and some missin [...]


  • James

    It's hard to judge a book written nearly a century ago. As other reviews here have noted, this was derived from a radio show and the overlap shows in the announced fashion of the prose. It's quite predictable, often ridiculous and loaded with ex machina. But if you can get past that - and some unfortunate artifacts from the time - it's an interesting chunk of history that would help inspire the likes of Batman. So for what it is, I can't score it badly. But this is by no means what many current [...]


  • Michael Brown

    A great little dash back to the old pulp days. Like Doc Savage and other bigger than life characters that for 10 cents could keep you month after month part of strange and exotic adventures, the Shadow fought crime with a vengeance. Unlike some he would often shoot first and let the bad guys pay the full price for their crimes.


  • Alexander Case

    The ending was a little anti-climactic, and the plot for the first half really didn't go anywhere, but otherwise the story was enjoyable.


  • Sarah Crawford

    This is the first Shadow story which appeared on April 1, 1931. It's sort of an introduction to the Shadow but, as such, does not give any actual background to the character.Most of the book actually deals with Harry Vincent, a man who was going to kill himself but was stopped by the Shadow. He then becomes one of the Shadow's agents and we see a little about how they operate. He's to keep watch on a certain man and report to Claude Fellows, another of the Shadow's agent.The Shadow is investigat [...]


  • Sarah Crawford

    This is the first Shadow story which appeared on April 1, 1931. It's sort of an introduction to the Shadow but, as such, does not give any actual background to the character.Most of the book actually deals with Harry Vincent, a man who was going to kill himself but was stopped by the Shadow. He then becomes one of the Shadow's agents and we see a little about how they operate. He's to keep watch on a certain man and report to Claude Fellows, another of the Shadow's agent.The Shadow is investigat [...]


  • B. Reese

    When Alec Baldwin's "The Shadow" came out, I really liked it. At the time, I didn't know there were books, otherwise would have read them. I did try the radio dramas, but they didn't work for me at the time, despite the fact that as a teenager, my evening sometimes consisted of listening to audio dramas.At any rate, I've always wanted more Shadow, because let's face it. Batman started out as a rip off of the Shadow, or at least a major influence. On to this book. First, the Shadow himself is ver [...]


  • Michael Emond

    I have always loved the idea of the Shadow and read many of the comics in the 80's about him and saw the movie with Alec Baldwin and even listened to a few radio programs from the 30's with him. But reading the pulps for the first time (this year) I get to appreciate how the Shadow was first introduced to the world. Through the pen of Walter Gibson (under the pen name of Maxwell Grant). The first two I read were fun but didn't really sweep me away however this one, the first Shadow book written, [...]


  • Steve

    This is the first novel in the long-running series of pulps starring The Shadow. I'd read it when it was reprinted in 1969 in a Bantam paperback edition, but it's been 47 years since then, and I only remembered dimly a couple of scenes. I read a lot of Shadow novels back in the day. Recognizing that there are some absurd holes in the plot, especially when it comes to people being able to perfectly imitate somebody else, I enjoyed the heck out of this first adventure. Here's Harry Vincent, saved [...]


  • William Cameron

    first book in the series, mostly setting up major players and background (Burbank, Harry Vincent etc). The protagonist here is Harry Vincent, and not the shadow. This is early days in the series and for the next few books Harry Vincent plays the main role, its not until later where we get more of the Shadow in the lead. The books are pretty heavily dated, taking place in New York of the 1930's, but they are quick reads (not really books per say more like Novellas) and the style is pretty straigh [...]


  • Donald Mosier

    So where does this book really rate. Perhaps I gave it four stars because of its classic nature. If it was a new book today, it would probably rate three stars, orpossibly even two. But I liked it so it gets four. I read the first two or three Shadow books back when I was in High School. I suspect those had been updated for the then modern times, but I really have very little complete memory of how they transpired. I can only remember with detail the beginning of the first book, the rescue of a [...]


  • Tosh

    When you get down to it characters like Fantomas, Arsene Lupin, and America's pulp creation The Shadow are terrorists. They all work in the shadows and their actual identities are consistently being changed on a regular basis.This is the first book of the Shadow serires and I think it's quite a remarkable contribution to pulp literature.The Shadow has no fixed identity at this time. Lamont Cranston (I may have the spelling wrong, sorry!) is introduced being part of one of the Shadow's identities [...]


  • Jim Dooley

    The first book in The Shadow series is a lot of fun, and a real eye-opener to those who were only familiar with the radio and movie dramas. The focus is on one of The Shadow's operatives, so everything we learn about the mysterious entity is filtered through that view. I suppose that those accustomed to having our pulp heroes front and center will find this a bit disorienting, but I liked the approach. I especially liked The Shadow having a number of manifestationst just Lamont Cranston who avid [...]


  • Karen

    This is the first Shadow story, and it has a great opening, with suicidal Harry Vincent rescued by a mysterious figure and given new purpose as an agent of The Shadow. The main story doesn't quite live up to it, and I found my attention wandering a little. I think maybe there's just not enough Shadow in it.In the early Shadow stories The Shadow is just a little bit too mysterious, only popping up at the most dramatic points, and then vanishing again immediately afterwards. Harry Vincent is okay [...]


  • Tony

    I have decided to start reading The Shadow series. This first story is a good crime story which moves along at a mostly rapid pace. I was surprised to find that it was easy to slip into the time frame of the story. It did not seem extremely dated, and I enjoyed the author's style of writing. There are several surprises along the way. There seemed to be a few too many coincidences along the way, but it certainly made me want to continue reading the stories.There are definitely a couple of slow po [...]


  • Mike Jensen

    The book’s flaws are manifold, and include pointless scenes and padding to turn what would naturally be a novella into a novel. But the mystery of the Shadow and his agents creates interest, and so does the pulpy, sometimes fast paced story. On the basis of this book alone it is difficult to see why the Shadow series lasted so long, but Gibson sets up a world that can be developed later. Not as bad as expected.


  • Christopher Ryan

    The blew me away as a kid and still stands up today. Definitely pulp, but Grant has a fluid style that holds up. additionally, the character is among the most intriguing in the super hero genre. one of the earliest anti-heroes. predates comic book superheroes. this even predates the acclaimed radio show. it all starts here. And the cover art by Jim Steranko absolutely kills.


  • Jeff Beland

    I really enjoyed this book. As a fan of the radio show, 1939 movie serial, & the 1994 movie I was eager to read this. I especially liked the fact that it kept The Shadow such s mystery (He had not yet taken on the identity of Lamont Cranston) & the story is told by one of his agents with The Shadow appearing out of nowhere when he needs to.


  • Nawfal

    The story is a little "sketchy." The main character is H. Vincent - and not really The Shadow. It's action pulp. All of these facts now stated. I quite enjoyed this. It's a fun treat to read the lingo from those days. The Shadow is very cool and mysterious, which was my minimum requirement for this novel. Recommend to: fans of Batman, Phantom, vintage crime, noir.


  • Glenn White

    Early days of The Shadow, so he was still evolving as a character. Nicely gloomy atmosphere whenever he's around. Walter Gibson (the real name of the author) maintained the mystery around The Shadow very well. Good fun read. I've read quite a few Shadow books, but I've decided to start from the beginning this time around. Only about another 335 to go!


  • Jon II

    Why have I waited so long to atart reading this series? Dunno. But I enjoyed this opening adventure a great deal. And it has merely whet my appetite for more. I look forward to continuing the adventure!


  • Jeff Chase

    A fun start to the longest running series of all time. I was familiar with the Shadow through old time radio, and it's interesting to see the roots of the series. I look forward to the next 324 (or so) entries.


  • Timothy Boyd

    When it comes to pulp heroes there are 2 or 3 great standouts and the Shadow is one of those. The stories are fast paced and action filled. The mystery just adds to the excitement. With his army of agents to help the Shadow never lets you down for a great read. Highly recommended


  • X-ray

    first edition mother fuckers!


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  • ✓ The Living Shadow || ☆ PDF Read by á Walter B. Gibson Maxwell Grant
    285 Walter B. Gibson Maxwell Grant
  • thumbnail Title: ✓ The Living Shadow || ☆ PDF Read by á Walter B. Gibson Maxwell Grant
    Posted by:Walter B. Gibson Maxwell Grant
    Published :2019-03-01T19:04:29+00:00