[PDF] Download ↠ The Running Hare: The Secret Life of Farmland | by é John Lewis-Stempel

By John Lewis-Stempel | Comments: ( 700 ) | Date: ( Nov 12, 2019 )

From the Winner of the Thwaites Wainwright Prize 2015Traditional ploughland is disappearing Seven cornfield flowers have become extinct in the last twenty years Once abundant, the corn bunting and the lapwing are on the Red List The corncrake is all but extinct in England And the hare is running for its life.Written in exquisite prose, The Running Hare tells the storyFrom the Winner of the Thwaites Wainwright Prize 2015Traditional ploughland is disappearing Seven cornfield flowers have become extinct in the last twenty years Once abundant, the corn bunting and the lapwing are on the Red List The corncrake is all but extinct in England And the hare is running for its life.Written in exquisite prose, The Running Hare tells the story of the wild animals and plants that live in and under our ploughland, from the labouring microbes to the patrolling kestrel above the corn, from the linnet pecking at seeds to the seven spot ladybird that eats the aphids that eat the crop It recalls an era before open roofed factories and silent, empty fields, recording the ongoing destruction of the unique, fragile, glorious ploughland that exists just down the village lane.But it is also the story of ploughland through the eyes of man who took on a field and husbanded it in a natural, traditional way, restoring its fertility and wildlife, bringing back the old farmland flowers and animals John Lewis Stempel demonstrates that it is still possible to create a place where the hare can rest safe.


  • Title: The Running Hare: The Secret Life of Farmland
  • Author: John Lewis-Stempel
  • ISBN: 9780857523266
  • Page: 177
  • Format: Hardcover

About Author:

John Lewis-Stempel

John Lewis-Stempel Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Running Hare: The Secret Life of Farmland book, this is one of the most wanted John Lewis-Stempel author readers around the world.


The Running Hare The Secret Life of Farmland by John Apr , And the hare is running for its life Written in exquisite prose, The Running Hare tells the story of the wild animals and plants that live in and under our ploughland, from the labouring microbes to the patrolling kestrel above the corn, from the linnet pecking at seeds to the seven spot ladybird that eats the aphids that eat the crop. Home Running Hare in Ewloe Pub and Restaurant Carvery A modern family friendly pub built to offer a great place to eat out in North Wales for both locals and travellers, The Running Hare serves a traditional carvery alongside a daily menu of classic meals. Running Hare Vineyard Award winning wines in Southern Only a short drive from Washington DC is Running Hare Vineyard, a little bit of Tuscany and Napa in Southern Maryland We have live music on select weekends in our Outdoor Tasting area You are invited to bring a picnic lunch and make a day of it The Running Hare The Secret Life of Farmland by John May , The Running Hare The Secret Life of Farmland by John Lewis Stempel review The environmentalist s account of the year he spent restoring wildlife to The Running Hare The Secret Life of Farmland NHBS Good Written in exquisite prose, The Running Hare tells the story of the wild animals and plants that live in and under our ploughland, from the labouring microbes to the patrolling kestrel above the corn, from the linnet pecking at seeds to the seven spot ladybird that eats the aphids that eat the crop. The Running Hare The Secret Life of Farmland John Lewis Feb , The Running Hare The Secret Life of Farmland Paperback April , by John Lewis Stempel Author


Comments The Running Hare: The Secret Life of Farmland

  • Bettie☯

    BOTWbbc/programmes/b078xf14Description: A close up and intimate natural history by John Lewis-Stempel. By taking an abandoned field close to his farm, he observes in minute detail the behaviour of plants, birds and animals that are being displaced by agribusiness. In telling the story of one field, he tells the story of our countryside, our language, our religion and our food. But in transforming one field, he creates a haven for one particular animal close to his heart - the brown hare.In the o [...]


  • Paul

    Industrial farming has succeeded in turning turn fields into open roofed factories. Copious amounts of fertiliser and weed killers have decimated the natural environment. Plants, birds and animals that were once common sights in the countryside are now very rare or no longer exist. The fields are now only able to support the growing crop. These fields are silent; empty of life.It used to be very different. A field of wheat supported a whole eco-system, from the worms in the ground, all the way u [...]


  • Rebecca Foster

    (Nearly 3.5) This is the record of a year of old-fashioned farming: Lewis-Stempel rented a several-acre field called Flinders, planted wildflowers in with his wheat and corn, and plowed it himself. Not a pesticide in sight. He attracted hares and other mammals, as well as numerous species of birds – all in all, much more life than your average field farmed by modern methods.Unfortunately, I didn’t like this nearly as much as Meadowland. The first half is great, but then I got the feeling tha [...]


  • Penny

    John Lewis-Stempel is that rare breed - a farmer who is also an environmentalist. In The Running Hare he 'borrows' a field to experiment growing corn along with wildflowers - the idea is to see how this old fashioned idea of doing things impacts on the wildlife of the area. Modern farming is all about yield, but Lewis-Stempel spells out loud and clear (often with statistics) the terrible effect this is having on our animals, birds and flowers. The farmers next door to his field are known as The [...]


  • Laura

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the Week:A close up and intimate natural history by John Lewis-Stempel. By taking an abandoned field close to his farm, he observes in minute detail the behaviour of plants, birds and animals that are being displaced by agribusiness. In telling the story of one field, he tells the story of our countryside, our language, our religion and our food. But in transforming one field, he creates a haven for one particular animal close to his heart - the brown hare.In the openi [...]


  • Catherine

    Informative, funny, beautiful, heart breaking.


  • Nancy

    Nominated for Wainwright Prize 2017.I hope it wins!The author has seen hares in the moonglowgazed at the heavenshe's felt the true peace on earth.It is a gem!#MustReadPS Yes, jackdaws are the original dysfunctional family!


  • Anne Fenn

    What a great read. First, it's poetry, second it's about the English countryside.


  • Wanda

    28 APR 2016 - recommendation through Bettie. Thank you.


  • Denzil

    A book that I thoroughly enjoyed reading, but which left me feeling a strange mix of both hope and despair.Hope, because it shows just how the countryside can be rejuvenated through careful, nature-friendly farming. In this case Lewis-Stempel simply plants a wheat field with wild flower seeds in the mix, and creates a border around the field of wild flowers. The transformation is incredible: “The poppies, corn chamomile, cornflower and corn marigold light up the wheat.” “This kingdom of fl [...]


  • Rick

    If you would only read one book by this author you should try Meadowlands first, I like it more, and not only because I read it first I think, it was more compelling. But I still liked this one very much, and for several reasons. First, it reminds me of my granddad and his farm where I helped out in the harvesting in a long hot summer (and played a lot). Second, I love this kind of micro-histories of one place at a defined period of time. Third, it made me dream and feel like going out, walking, [...]


  • Claire

    Loved this book.


  • Kris McCracken

    In a way, this book reads like a love letter to the English countryside, and one field in particular. There is a heady mix of agricultural history, rural folklore, geography, childhood memories and an odd grab-bag of facts. For example, in an aside on the joys of ploughing by hand, we learn that the ploughman’s lunch was an invention by the British Cheese Bureau in the 1950s to increase the sales of cheese!I enjoyed it.


  • Paul

    stunning well written; John combines the sad longing for a past not yet realised, with a now that will soon pass. He writes about the combination of things, wildlife and farming, loss and creating, passion and anger, Hares and people. Perhaps what he most writes about is hope. I was deeply moved and loved this book.


  • Annabel Frazer

    I had not read the author's previous book(s?) and did not know what to expect, but was bought this for my birthday and immediately loved the cover. (Always judge a book by its cover!) On the other hand, I was put off by the use of the present tense, a currently ubiquitous fashion which I simply do not get. It's not particularly original any more, it doesn't in my view make the reading experience any better and as a writer, you can get into really nasty tangles with the distant past.That aside, t [...]


  • Karen Mace

    This was a fascinating and delightful read of one mans' vision and journey in reclaiming some farmland to return it to the ways of old, along with the wildlife and wildflowers that this brings along with it. It is beautifully written with such passion that it often made me angry - not at the book but at the way mankind looks at nature nowadays, just trying to find the easiest and quickest way of producing things, without any thought to the damage that does in the long term. We seem to have forgo [...]


  • Monica

    A fascinating and insightful look at what modern day farming has cost our countryside. John Lewis-Stempel has one year to experiment and create an old-fashioned, organic wheat field. The nature that this field attracts over the course of the year is so well documented, and written so enticingly, it draws the reader outside. The book makes a compelling case for chemical-free farming and inspired me to read more nature writing books, learn more about the bird species I hadn't come across before. F [...]


  • Alberta Ross

    This is a beautifully written if worrying book - John Lewis-Stempel sets out to 'rescue a field - a 'dead' field of modern agricultural practice - his aim to farm it the 'old fashioned' way - no chemicals and hand in hand with 'nature'. There is no doubt the old ways were hard work! His love of the natural world and his love and usage of the English language meld wonderfully together. He manages to combine this account of his quest with insights into the past farming culture, facts about what we [...]


  • John

    Fascinating account of one man's attempt to restore a farm to the natural methods of sowing and reaping, in a manner that would facilitate the visitation of the running hare — a potent symbol of healthy, "real" farming, now practically eradicate from the industrial farmscapes of England and Wales. Moving, infuriating, bewildering are the emotions it stirred in me. Towards the middle of the book, the narrative lost traction with me, as it bedded down into details and iterative accounts of the f [...]


  • Alex S. Bradshaw

    A really wonderful book that was both beautiful and poignant. I think a well-timed book that looks at farming, its effects on nature, and how taking a step back from the mega-efficient-industrial farms now. John Lewis-Stempel looks at his new field through the lense of someone who has worked with the land for many years and loves it deeply. It's a wonderful read to get to be able to experience that closeness, to find out the history behind some traditions, and also see that although the yield ma [...]


  • Bradley

    A beautifully written book. The narrative equivalent to those long hot summers of youth where birds sang and butterflies filled the air. Those times might return but it will not be in my lifetime.JLS took a few small fields and in turning back the clock on the agri-business and witnessed a flourishing of wildlife.The poisoning of our soil in the pursuit of profit via lower costs has extracted a heavy price and we have not stopped paying for it yet. To continue along the path we are currently on [...]


  • Michael B

    Charting the life of a reclaimed arable field over a year, this book is easy to read and, at times, poetic and moving. However, there is a jocular, informal element that doesn't sit well with me, and sometimes felt too forced. Far from being careful and precise, the writing is sometimes rushed and careless. There are lots of quotes from other nature writers, especially Richard Jefferies. Some of them are analysed; some are plonked on the page with little explanation - but they do serve as a cata [...]


  • Carol Aldred

    Thoroughly enjoyed this exercise in environmental farming.Even though the book wasn't set in a part of the country I am particularly interested in , the descriptions of the area and its wildlife was enthralling, especially the passages about the hares.The only reason it didn't get a 5* rating was I found some of the quotations overly long. I'm looking forward to reading more of this author's work.


  • Andrew Cox

    Absolutely delightful. Beautiful writing. John Clare is obviously a big influence & Richard Jeffries is someone I would like to find out more about. Although this is not hugely different from Meadowland (it is all about a field) the details about ploughing & the "old ways" of farming are illuminating & interesting. I am most envious of John Lewis-Stempel


  • Mark

    While undoubtedly a good and well-written book, I struggled a little. I read it as part of a book club membership and have little interest in or knowledge of the subject matter. Nonetheless, for a reader more suited, it would be undoubtedly excellent. My two stars are, thus, not representative.


  • Paul Salter

    A wonderful, relaxing and informative read. The book is beautifully written, and while fairly light, does include numerous factual references and literary quotations to illustrate his points and help to formulate a vision of the countryside, past and present. Highly recommended.


  • Carro

    The author fondly remembers the wildlife friendly, wild flower speckled corn fields of his childhood and wants to recreate one. He goes looking for land to rent to make this happen - but runs into the main reaction of "you want to grow weeds?".He finally finds some land to rent - at a considerable distance from his home - so a lot of hard work and travelling is involved. This is the story of his year growing corn, encouraging wildlife into the field and observing what is happening in nearby "mod [...]


  • Pranky reads

    This book is like music for an environment loverI saw the hares runningThe birds whistlingThe wheat harvestingThe poppies swayingThe snow fallingIt's like a literary tribute to the farmland#booksonenvironment #environment #farmland #therunninghare #johnlewisstempel


  • Kirsty Mcdougall

    If nature writing is your thing this is the most beautifully written book! The descriptiveness is outstanding at creating interest in the beauty of a hare running through a field. Not a sit down get engrossed book but fun to read in short bouts and appreciate the writing.


  • Susan Grimshaw

    A beautifully written account of a year farming for the benefit of wildlife. It sadly makes one realise how serious the decline in wildlife is, due to unsympathetic agricultural practices.


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  • [PDF] Download ↠ The Running Hare: The Secret Life of Farmland | by é John Lewis-Stempel
    177 John Lewis-Stempel
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ↠ The Running Hare: The Secret Life of Farmland | by é John Lewis-Stempel
    Posted by:John Lewis-Stempel
    Published :2019-08-10T19:55:56+00:00