[PDF] Download ✓ Every Cradle is a Grave: Rethinking the Ethics of Birth and Suicide | by × SarahPerry

By SarahPerry | Comments: ( 982 ) | Date: ( Jan 25, 2020 )

Millions of years ago, humans just happened Accidents of environment and genetics contributed to the creation of sentient beings like us Today, however, people no longer just happen they are created by the voluntary acts of other people.This book examines several questions about the ethics of human existence Is it a good thing, for humans, that humans happened IsMillions of years ago, humans just happened Accidents of environment and genetics contributed to the creation of sentient beings like us Today, however, people no longer just happen they are created by the voluntary acts of other people.This book examines several questions about the ethics of human existence Is it a good thing, for humans, that humans happened Is it ethical to keep making new humans, now that reproduction is under our control And given that a person exists through no fault or choice of his own , is it immoral or irrational for him to refuse to live out his natural lifespan All these questions are answered in the negative not out of misanthropy, but rather out of empathy for human suffering and respect for human autonomy.


  • Title: Every Cradle is a Grave: Rethinking the Ethics of Birth and Suicide
  • Author: SarahPerry
  • ISBN: 9781616583507
  • Page: 165
  • Format: Paperback

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SarahPerry

SarahPerry Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Every Cradle is a Grave: Rethinking the Ethics of Birth and Suicide book, this is one of the most wanted SarahPerry author readers around the world.



Comments Every Cradle is a Grave: Rethinking the Ethics of Birth and Suicide

  • Anita Dalton

    Sarah Perry wrote this book from a place of philosophical intellectualism and factual integrity. She exhaustively researched the hows and whys of suicide and procreation and makes a very compelling case for making suicide accessible for people who do not want to live and for considering whether or not it is ethical to continue to create new humans whose lives may be more a burden to them than a gift. As she deftly picks apart the arguments against suicide and antinatalism, she bestows upon manki [...]


  • davidkwca

    First off, it probably is important to understand the author's background. After multiple failed attempts at suicide, she seems to have become frustrated with a world where social nicety prohibits you from even speaking about suicide. This book is her attempt to change this. While I don't want to charge her with being biased in favor of one position, you might want to keep this in mind while reading the book. Nevertheless this little book, only a little more than 200 pages in length, is dense wi [...]


  • Chris Beiser

    This is a peculiar one. Probably not for the faint of heart, but I highly recommend it. I didn’t find myself agreeing with every line, and I think Sarah is guilty of (unintentionally) minimizing the number of suicides that may be impulsive, but I walked away with a very different view of the ethics of birth and suicide.After finishing it, I had a brief conversation with Sarah— you can see the start of the thread here: twitter/ctbeiser/status/6


  • The Brain in the Jar

    Two ideas are hard-wired into our minds. We believe life is good and that forcing people into existence is a positive thing not because of rational thinking. Genes make us think this way, because this is how they progress. Without these ideas, an organism kills itself and doesn’t produce offspring. Genes die, and genes’ purpose is to continue.People always killed themselves. Some cultures even claimed it’s virtuous in certain situations. We’ve made huge ‘progress’ (Or, more correctly [...]


  • Jem Sandhu

    The legal and moral arguments set out in this book will be of use to lawyers, policy-makers, and anyone else looking for counterarguments to the "pro-existence bias" present in conversations around, for example, abortion or euthanasia. However, this is far from a scholarly work: Perry cheapens her arguments with snide remarks about the life projects that people choose to give their lives meaning, preferring those undertakings that fit with her biases. So, graduate school is a "gamble", but house [...]


  • Ben Arzate

    This is a controversial book, for sure. However, it's one well worth reading. Perry's conclusions on the ethical implications of suicide and birth go completely against the grain. Even if you don't agree with them, this book will force you to rethink your views on life, meaning, and how the human mind works.Full Review


  • Jason Roy

    Thought-provoking, insightful, and very well written. Highly recommended for people interested in moral philosophy, bioethics, or who just like to have their sacred beliefs challenged.


  • Wendy

    This is a book about ethics. However, Sarah Perry is clear that people do not change their views on ethics from exposure to reasoned argument; so she is not out to persuade. She is also very clear that she is arguing points that most people would consider evil. Basically, that life is very bad and that people should not have babies or to create aware beings (whose interests are very hard to predict before that being is created) and that suicide is not bad but an ethically rational response to th [...]


  • Samuel

    one of the easier anti-natalist positions to be completely unconvinced by if your not also inclined to believe oversimplisitic and at times wilfully ignorant and contradictory narratives like 'zeitgeist' and hypernormalisation


  • Stephen Douglas Rowland

    2½. Interesting arguments, but I feel the whole is unfocused.


  • ryan

    Changed my view on both the cradle and the grave. Read it.


  • Jordan

    One of the best books I've ever read. An unflinching, jarring book that took a lot of courage to write. If you want to challenge/doubt your most sacred, unquestionable beliefs, read this.


  • Thomas

    Some pretty challenging ideas. Mostly suicide, not so much antinatalism. Arguments are mostly coherent but at times felt like conclusions were foregone.


  • Patafyzak

    Morally challenging, interesting and very well written.


  • Existanza

    The perfect mixture of "well-researched" and "witty".


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  • [PDF] Download ✓ Every Cradle is a Grave: Rethinking the Ethics of Birth and Suicide | by × SarahPerry
    165 SarahPerry
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ✓ Every Cradle is a Grave: Rethinking the Ethics of Birth and Suicide | by × SarahPerry
    Posted by:SarahPerry
    Published :2019-01-08T15:37:47+00:00