Best Read [William Appleman Williams] ✓ The Tragedy of American Diplomacy || [Nonfiction Book] PDF ò

By William Appleman Williams | Comments: ( 700 ) | Date: ( Jan 19, 2020 )

A brilliant book on foreign affairs Adolf A Berle Jr New York Times Book Review This incisive interpretation of American foreign policy ranks as a classic in American thought First published in 1959, the book offered an analysis of the wellsprings of American foreign policy that shed light on the tensions of the Cold War and the deeper impulses leading to the Ameri A brilliant book on foreign affairs Adolf A Berle Jr New York Times Book Review This incisive interpretation of American foreign policy ranks as a classic in American thought First published in 1959, the book offered an analysis of the wellsprings of American foreign policy that shed light on the tensions of the Cold War and the deeper impulses leading to the American intervention in Vietnam William Appleman Williams brilliantly explores the ways in which ideology and political economy intertwined over time to propel American expansion and empire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries The powerful relevance of Williams s interpretation to world politics has only been strengthened by recent events in Central Asia and the Persian Gulf Williams allows us to see that the interests and beliefs that once sent American troops into Texas and California, or Latin America and East Asia, also propelled American forces into Iraq.


  • Title: The Tragedy of American Diplomacy
  • Author: William Appleman Williams
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 454
  • Format: Paperback

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William Appleman Williams

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Comments The Tragedy of American Diplomacy

  • Lobstergirl

    I wish I could say I read this with the thoroughness of a baboon picking fleas off its paramour. With about half my normal focus, I could tell there was lots of good stuff in here. One of the main themes is that American foreign policy, from 1898 beginning with the Open Door Notes to about 1958 when the book was published, has always been heavily influenced by corporations and their need for markets. America's surplus products were a huge driver of policy, since Americans could only consume so m [...]


  • Tim

    The fact that this book has become a classic is hardly debatable. Williams’ examination of American foreign policy is now in its fourth printing with this 50th anniversary edition. The book takes a detailed look at “The Open Door Policy” which evolved out The Open Door Notes of the late 19th century. It shows that, for better or worse, American Capitalism had to find and constantly expand into foreign markets in order for there to be freedom and prosperity at home. Williams argues that not [...]


  • Ram

    The greatest (?) American historian goes on a diatribe--only the tenured can get away with this kind of frankness. In its place and time, The Tragedy of American Diplomacy was bracing for its vision of history as leading inexorably, stupidly, to global thermonuclear war. And Wm. A. Williams was p-i-s-s-e-d! The best kind of history: a useful one. Read it.


  • Jack

    A fun read. America wants money and always has: free trade and pursuit of markets have been the consistent theme of American policy since the later 19th century, says Williams. And this pursuit has resulted in outcomes contrary to America's preferences. For example, we pushed so far to have an important presence in many countries, that we enabled radicals to make those countries communist. It makes sense and I'm sure there is some truth in it. But the book is far too simplistic. This country can [...]


  • Xan Shadowflutter

    An important contrarian view of American foreign policy. Thesis: American economic security has driven American foreign policy since the Spanish American War. American economic success and internal social stability depends upon economic expansion beyond American borders and throughout world, and Open Door Policy, Good Neighbor Policy, and other "innocently named policies" belie their intent. Should be read alongside a more traditional American foreign policy book for best understanding.


  • itpdx

    Williams looks at the history of the Open Door Policy, which was the US's idea to have an economic empire without colonialism. He looks at how the policy developed starting about 1890 and had some success (for the US) early on but how the idea was not critically re-assessed and was partially to blame for diplomatic blinders that created the Cold War and the Vietnam War. And how the policy did not benefit other countries as the proponents said it would. The first edition of the book was published [...]


  • Corey

    Thought provoking. Clearly shows strong linkage between American business interests and foreign policy. Debunks notion that Americans were idealistic, more practical. Not very good history though. I mean evidence seemed to be arrayed to prove a point. For example, no effort was made to explain ideas or event, which did not fit his narrative. For example he constantly stressed that America constantly pushed the open door, but never even mentioned Smoot-Hawley.


  • Virginia Vayna

    A classic look into America and how big business exploited overseas resources. A wonderful and well-documented book with ample sources to check. If you ever wondered how America became so involved with the powers of big business, this book helps pinpoint the beginnings of such relationship. The American oversea endeavors are fully encouraged by the Open Door policy of the late 19th century. A must read for avid historians.


  • Sean Chick

    What a horrible book. There are no footnotes and vague sweeping generalizations. Only popular because the New Left, in its fetishistic hatred of America, latched onto this. The main trouble though is that Williams took what was probably true about the Cold War and shoe-horned it onto the Progressive Era and New Deal. Of course the New Left is best at attacking liberal movements of the past and undermining the ideals of effective liberalism.


  • Darrell Fawley

    This is a very interesting book if you are looking to think critically about American foreign policy and the our role in the world. It was not written with mass consumption in mind, so it is not a page turner, but Williams does a good job of presenting an argument that America acts against her own values on the world stage.


  • Stella

    Excellent book about the failure of American liberalism. Williams looks at the creation of the modern liberal (who he believes was born out of the more reactionary measures of the Second New Deal). Scathing review of both modern liberals and FDR. Be prepared to question all of your preconceived notions of FDR while you read.


  • Joe

    Interesting take on the Open Door Policy and the lasting effect it had on U.S society. Williams defends his view that American diplomacy is tragic pretty well, using solid evidence. The book can be bland at times but overall it gives excellent insight into U.S Foreign Relations from the 1900s to around the 1960s.


  • Brandy

    Read this for a grad class.I found this book thoroughly enjoyable, due to Williams' unbridled bias and anger. For those same reasons, though, I wouldn't recommend this book to someone who didn't already have a decent background in foreign policy. Enjoyable though it is, it is definitely not a balanced examination.


  • Eleanore

    About as enjoyable as a pebble in my shoe. However, this book asks some important questions that continue to be relevant. It is also worth reading as one of the most influential texts from the history of US Foreign Policy.


  • April

    Interesting concept concerning the egoism of the American government immediately out of the isolationist and into intervention of world affairs. Highly recommend but not for people who have very minimal knowledge of 20th century history or foreign affairs/diplomacy (could be highly confusing).


  • Frank Stein

    My first book at the Rutgers PhD program, so no more time for reviews, but this was the Marxist drivel I referenced on my Facebook page.


  • AskHistorians

    A classic book on American foreign affairs by the prominent revisionist historian. Follows American foreign policy throughout the early Cold War.


  • Rhonda

    Holds true from the time it was written in 1959 to today.


  • Josh Paul

    The "open door" policy. I radical, but not crazily radical, discussion of 100 years of American foreign policy.


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  • Best Read [William Appleman Williams] ✓ The Tragedy of American Diplomacy || [Nonfiction Book] PDF ò
    454 William Appleman Williams
  • thumbnail Title: Best Read [William Appleman Williams] ✓ The Tragedy of American Diplomacy || [Nonfiction Book] PDF ò
    Posted by:William Appleman Williams
    Published :2019-02-20T23:00:02+00:00