✓ African Psycho || É PDF Read by ↠ Alain Mabanckou Christine Schwartz Hartley

By Alain Mabanckou Christine Schwartz Hartley | Comments: ( 659 ) | Date: ( Nov 13, 2019 )

Its title recalls Bret Easton Ellis s infamous book, but while Ellis s narrator was a blank slate, African Psycho s protagonist is a quivering mass of lies, neuroses, and relentless internal chatter Gregoire Nakobomayo, a petty criminal, has decided to kill his girlfriend Germaine He s planned the crime for some time, but still, the act of murder requires a bit of psychoIts title recalls Bret Easton Ellis s infamous book, but while Ellis s narrator was a blank slate, African Psycho s protagonist is a quivering mass of lies, neuroses, and relentless internal chatter Gregoire Nakobomayo, a petty criminal, has decided to kill his girlfriend Germaine He s planned the crime for some time, but still, the act of murder requires a bit of psychological and logistical preparation Luckily, he has a mentor to call on, the far accomplished serial killer Angoualima The fact that Angoualima is dead doesn t prevent Gregoire from holding lengthy conversations with him Little by little, Gregoire interweaves Angoualima s life and criminal exploits with his own Continuing with the plan despite a string of botched attempts, Gregoire s final shot at offing Germaine leads to an abrupt unraveling Lauded in France for its fresh and witty style, African Psycho s inventive use of language surprises and relieves the reader by injecting humor into this disturbing subject.


  • Title: African Psycho
  • Author: Alain Mabanckou Christine Schwartz Hartley
  • ISBN: 9781933368504
  • Page: 466
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

Alain Mabanckou Christine Schwartz Hartley

Alain Mabanckou was born in 1966 in Congo Brazzaville French Congo He currently resides in Los Angeles, where he teaches literature at UCLA, having previously spent four years at the University of Michigan Mabanckou will be a Fellow in the Humanities Council at Princeton University in 2007 2008 One of Francophone Africa s most prolific contemporary writers, he is the author of six volumes of poetry and six novels He received the Sub Saharan Africa Literary Prize in 1999 for his first novel, Blue White Red, the Prize of the Five Francophone Continents for Broken Glass, and the Prix Renaudot in 2006 for Memoirs of a Porcupine He was selected by the French publishing trade journal Lire as one of the fifty writers to watch out for in the coming century His most recent book is African Psycho.Christine Schwartz Hartley is the translator of African Psycho The former deputy editor of Art Auction magazine is a freelance editor, translator, and writer based in Paris and Brooklyn Her articles have appeared in the New York Times Book Review, Village Voice, Interior Design, and Elle Decor, among other publications French born, she holds a licence s lettres English from the Universit Paris IVSorbonne, a diploma from the Institut dEtudes Politiques de Paris, and a masters in journalism from New York University.



Comments African Psycho

  • Diana Simumpande

    This book was very disturbing. Think Pinky and the Brain but instead of an obsessive desire to take over the world, Gregoire (and his rectangular shaped head) is consumed with the desire to rape and murder. Specifically to be able to rise to the same infamy and esteem as his mentor, and idol, the incredibly vicious and very dead Angoualima. Gregoire hasn't had the best childhood and some of his experiences have made him quite an angry man as well as a misogynist. While this book is very disturbi [...]


  • John

    For Christmas, why not a man who can murder as an act of vanity? As self-expression! The narrator of AFRICAN PSYCHO claims to share that pathology: “to kill at last, crush, I was going to be somebody.” Such a lunatic yearning is familiar in fiction, a trick that goes back at least to Dostoevsky. The drama’s in the waffling: will he or won’t he? But Mabanckou (a Congolese who's won prizes in France), discovers a fascinating new way to hang you up on those tenterhooks. His novel presents n [...]


  • BlackBookie

    This book was a slow burn, so I was expecting it to be fantastic as it progressed. The ending was so anticlimactic. I wouldn't pick it up again.


  • Carloesse

    Si fa leggere, anche rapidamente date le non molte pagine, e lascia qualche sorriso qua e là (divertenti i dialoghi del maldestro protagonista con il fantasma del suo idolo pluriomicida e serial-killer di cui vorrebbe emulare le gesta e la fama, e che si materializza sulla tomba ogni volta che va a rendergli omaggio e venerazione), ma ben poco di più per farsi ricordare.


  • Marc

    A slim novel with a rather unique narrator--angry, frustrated, misogynistic, and delusional. Our dear Gregoire aspires to commit murder like his idol, a serial killer named Angoualima. This is as much about the struggle of conscience as it is the frustration of the individual in relation to society.


  • Siyamthanda Skota

    - Yes, I love vulgarity. I claim it loud and clear. I love it because only it says what we are, without hideous masks we wear by nature, which turns us into mean beings, hypocrites, ceaselessly running after decency, a quality I couln't care less about.- Do I have to stress that I have no flowery memories from my youth other than those of the soccer games with rag-balls?


  • CiCi

    Maaaaaanere are elements of this book that are so vile and beyond cringeworthy. It's a disturbing story to say the least of a young man in the throughs of complete psychosis because of the context of this story, I would say this isn't one to love, but Mabanckou's writing is excellent. It's a first person narrative and gives a vivid glimpse into the mind of someone who is not only detached from reality but failing miserably at attempting to copy cat his muse, a mysterious serial killer, named Agu [...]


  • Pink

    I'm not sure what to think about this book. It was kind of crazy and had so much build up throughout, but I'm not sure it had the final climax or pay off that I was hoping for. Interesting enough to keep me engaged and wanting to try some more of Mabanckou's writing, but nothing I'll be shouting about.


  • Dylan Hussey

    Equally as hilarious as it is disconcerting and far superior to it's American counterpart. (That's because Easton Ellis is a bag of bloody nails!)


  • Leanne

    I identified with the main character with his macabre thoughts about people that he felt "insulted" him. I think we are all capable of having thoughts of killing someone but we draw the line at actually following through. Mabanckou take us through the thought process and preparation of a would be young serial killer in Africa. I didn't think that I would enjoy the supernatural aspect of the book (the main character's mentor is deceased and communicates with him from beyond) but it fit right in a [...]


  • Ivano Porpora

    Un libro molto interessante, e Angoualima il killer morto è una sorta di personificazione della perfezione cui tendiamo, sensibile e pericolosa.


  • Damon

    Good Stuff.


  • Eva

    I have decided to kill Germaine on December 29that is how the book captured me on its first sentence that left me with the why, how, where questions. Greg is a wannabee murderer who wants to kill Germaine, a whore he collected, lives with and decided to fatten her with the intention of finishing her off. All this to imitate his idol, Angoualima, the country's assassin who committed suicide. Greg wants to outdo his idol, be his disciple and get recognized on media. As a picked up child on the str [...]


  • Wathingira Muthang'ato

    3 stars and possibly a half star added on (still debating on the rating here. Not good enough for a 4 star, but definitely deserves more than 3 stars). Consider how the book opens "I have decided to kill Germaine on December 29. I have been thinking about this for weeks—" And just like that you are thrust into the weird, twisted, macabre, and fascinating mind of the narrator, an aspiring serial killer. The story gets more and more bizarre as you go deeper, compelling you to keep going even as [...]


  • Jayaprakash Satyamurthy

    Apart from the ways in which it reflects Brett Ellis' American Psycho and does or doesn't do for Africa today what that book did for America in its time, I see here a book that belongs with Against Nature and The Necrophiliac, the story of someone with a deeply warped sensibility, a kind of perverse idealist who falls short of his ideals. Its hard to like or pity him, but in the end it struck me that more of us share his ignominy than we'd like to admit, or why are serial killers still as popula [...]


  • Sophie

    If I knew when I bought it that this was a post modernist style, stream of consciousness text, I may not have picked it up. However, I'm glad I did as the ideas in the book were really different from other books I've read that center arround crime. It was genuinely funny, which I wasn't expecting. ***


  • Soumithri

    I think this book works better as an idea and something to talk about than something to actually be read. I really struggled with finishing it.


  • Angela

    Don’t believe the hype. Would work better as a short story instead of a novel imho. Maybe something has been lost in translation but I was left feeling disappointed.


  • Paolo Albera

    Inizio l'anno con le avventure di questo maldestro simpatico killer. Alcune trovate (come il pezzo dell'intervista TV) sono geniali


  • Kariuki Njiru

    It was a great book with a weak ending.


  • Bjorn

    Taking both its title and its central storyline from Bret Easton Ellis' insert-adjective-of-your-choice-here American Psycho (well, I liked it), Alain Mabanckou's African Psycho is a succinct, disturbing but also frustrating read. Succinct in that it gets in, throws its punches in merely 145 pages, and gets out again before it overstays its welcome. Disturbing in both its subject matter and the hinted-at society it takes place in. And frustrating in the way it's presented.If Ellis' serial killer [...]


  • Richard

    African Psycho concerns a would-be serial killer, Gregoire Nakobomayo, and the spiritual relationship he has developed with his phantom mentor, a far more accomplished serial killer, Angoualima.The title recalls Bret Easton Ellis' infamous book but while Ellis' narrator was blank, and the book eschewed any kind of psychological exposition, accepting pure psychosis as the bottomline, Mabanckou's protagonist is all psychology and relentless internal chatter and prevarication. The act of deciding t [...]


  • Prachi

    I vacillated between giving this book 3 or 4 stars. I happened to grab the original French novel after I'd finished the English version. Upon reading the first 20 pages of the French version, I can honestly say that THAT novel was a solid 4. This English translation, on the other hand, is a 3.5, or maybe just a 3. Something about the protagonist's awkward, humorous tone just seems to have been lost in translation. His neuroses and unreliability don't quite come off as well as they should in the [...]


  • Karen

    When AFRICAN PSYCHO by Alain Mabanckou arrived in my book stack, I really wasn't sure what to expect. I've finished it now and I'm still not sure what I got. But I do remember it!Gregoire is a neglected child - an ugly child - an anonymous child - abandoned by his parents - he's raised in an increasingly haphazard manner really by himself mostly. He vows he will be different. He will be remembered. He vows to escape his humdrum reality and commit a spectacular murder. Just like his idol - the se [...]


  • Brent Legault

    The comparisons of this book withAmerican Psycho are baffling to me. Other than the title, I see no resemblance. And stylistically, they are seperated by a lot more than a mere mer or a fricking fric. One might as well try to compare Franzen'sThe Corrections with Bernhard'sCorrection. I like this novel. I like what Mabanckou has done here. My favorite heroes are the incompetent ones. The sad sacks. The blundering boobs. There were times while reading this that I was reminded of Bunuel's film, Th [...]


  • Karen

    When AFRICAN PSYCHO by Alain Mabanckou arrived in my book stack, I really wasn't sure what to expect. I've finished it now and I'm still not sure what I got. But I do remember it!Gregoire is a neglected child - an ugly child - an anonymous child - abandoned by his parents - he's raised in an increasingly haphazard manner really by himself mostly. He vows he will be different. He will be remembered. He vows to escape his humdrum reality and commit a spectacular murder. Just like his idol - the se [...]


  • Stephanie

    A rant, monologue, and in the novel’s own words “blah, blah, blah” by a wanna-be serial killer who never kills. Set in the Ghanaian slum of “He-Who-Drinks-Water-Is-An-Idiot”, the narrator Gregroire tells us in great detail about his admiration for serial killer Angoualima, who in fact does kill, rapes and does strange things with cigars. Gregroire wants to emulate Angoualima’s bad deeds, get known by his countrymen and trump the police and media. The author may have an agenda here an [...]


  • Melinda

    Gregoire Nakobomayo with a decayed childhood as a ‘picked up’ child, abandoned. Gregorio swears to committing the ultimate atrocity – murder, the idea of this heinous act obsesses him.There are subtle voices besides the neurotic ramblings of Gregoire. Anger, poverty, corruption,racial tension, deception found in Central Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. The direct nature of the language forces the reader to explore the rooted issues of Africa and the narratives protagonist. A compelling read [...]


  • Marlowe

    Gregoire Nakobomayo is an aspiring serial killer. He idolizes Angoualima, a particularly brutal serial killer who had been on the prowl in Gregoire’s youth, and he has promised to Angoualima that he will be a good disciple, that he will kill.The story is set in a first person rambling style, allowing Gregoire to take us through his life (a “pick-up child,” he was abandoned at birth and raised in a series of foster homes), his “petty” criminal activities, and, ultimately, his plans to m [...]


  • Tony

    I picked this up hoping for an interesting cross-cultural version of something akin to Bret Easton Ellis's American Psycho. Alas, although this was originally published in France two years after the controversial American novel, the author has said in various interviews that although he loved Ellis's book, the only similarity lies in the title. Here, we meet an orphaned street child who has grown up to become an auto mechanic in an unnamed African country clearly based on the author's native Con [...]


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  • ✓ African Psycho || É PDF Read by ↠ Alain Mabanckou Christine Schwartz Hartley
    466 Alain Mabanckou Christine Schwartz Hartley
  • thumbnail Title: ✓ African Psycho || É PDF Read by ↠ Alain Mabanckou Christine Schwartz Hartley
    Posted by:Alain Mabanckou Christine Schwartz Hartley
    Published :2019-08-07T13:28:14+00:00