[PDF] ✓ Free Read ✓ Early Greece: The Bronze and Archaic Ages : by Moses I. Finley ↠

By Moses I. Finley | Comments: ( 819 ) | Date: ( Mar 30, 2020 )

M I Finley here reconstructs the preliterary background to Greek civilization by an examination of recent archeological discoveries and a critical reappraisal of older archeological evidence He discusses the problems that dependence on such evidence poses for the historian, for, although archeology reveals changes and even cataclysms, it rarely allows us than a rM I Finley here reconstructs the preliterary background to Greek civilization by an examination of recent archeological discoveries and a critical reappraisal of older archeological evidence He discusses the problems that dependence on such evidence poses for the historian, for, although archeology reveals changes and even cataclysms, it rarely allows us than a restricted view of a society under normal conditions He points out the difficulties in reconciling the mythological evidence and the archeological, particularly in Crete and Troy, and analyzes and distinguishes the elements of historic fact and legend in the Iliad and Odyssey.


  • Title: Early Greece: The Bronze and Archaic Ages
  • Author: Moses I. Finley
  • ISBN: 9780393300512
  • Page: 216
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

Moses I. Finley

Sir Moses I Finley was an American and English classical scholar His most notable work is The Ancient Economy 1973 , where he argued that status and civic ideology governed the economy in antiquity rather than rational economic motivations.He was born in 1912 in New York City as Moses Israel Finkelstein to Nathan Finkelstein and Anna Katzenellenbogen died in 1986 as a British subject He was educated at Syracuse University and Columbia University Although his M.A was in public law, most of his published work was in the field of ancient history, especially the social and economic aspects of the classical world.He taught at Columbia University and City College of New York, where he was influenced by members of the Frankfurt School who were working in exile in America In 1952, during the Red Scare, Finley was fired from his teaching job at Rutgers University in 1954, he was summoned by the United States Senate Internal Security Subcommittee and asked whether he had ever been a member of the Communist Party USA He invoked the Fifth Amendment and refused to answer.Unable subsequently to find work in the United States, Finley moved to England, where he taught classical studies for many years at Cambridge University, first as a Reader in Ancient Social and Economic History at Jesus College 1964 1970 , then as Professor of Ancient History 1970 1979 and eventually as Master of Darwin College 1976 1982 He broadened the scope of classical studies from philology to culture, economics, and society He became a British subject in 1962 and a Fellow of the British Academy in 1971, and was knighted in 1979.Among his works, The World of Odysseus 1954 proved seminal In it, he applied the findings of ethnologists and anthropologists like Marcel Mauss to illuminate Homer, a radical approach that was thought by his publishers to require a reassuring introduction by an established classicist, Maurice Bowra Paul Cartledge asserted in 1995, in retrospect Finley s little masterpiece can be seen as the seed of the present flowering of anthropologically related studies of ancient Greek culture and society 1 Finley s most influential work remains The Ancient Economy 1973 , based on his Sather Lectures at Berkeley the year before In The Ancient Economy, Finley launched an all out attack on the modernist tradition within the discipline of ancient economic history Following the example of Karl Polanyi, Finley argued that the ancient economy should not be analysed using the concepts of modern economic science, because ancient man had no notion of the economy as a separate sphere of society, and because economic actions in antiquity were determined not primarily by economic, but by social concerns.



Comments Early Greece: The Bronze and Archaic Ages

  • Yann

    Cet ouvrage présente une large part d'histoire de la Grèce antique antérieur à l'âge classique: l'âge du bronze, puis du fer. On peut séparer l'ouvrage en deux parties parties principales. La première traite de toute la période antérieure à l'invention de l'écriture, et qui est la plus difficile à comprendre, du fait la pauvreté en matériaux intelligibles, si ce n'est des ruines et vestiges épars. C'est la partie que j'ai trouvée la plus intéressante, car l'auteur explique asse [...]


  • Justin Evans

    Not too much to say here: no doubt this is slightly out of date, but Finley is so cautious--he's perfectly willing to say that we don't know this or that, rather than make uneducated guesses--that I doubt he steers us wrong too much. Otherwise, this is an ideal book on ancient Greece for me personally, since I can't handle the self-congratulatory liberal cheer-leading that goes on every time anyone talks about classical Greece. This book ends before classical Greece. Q.E.D.


  • Josho Brouwers

    A clear and concise introduction on Early Greece, written by the late Moses Finley. Originally published in 1970, the book obviously has become somewhat outdated, which is the sole reason for my relatively low rating. In less than 150 pages of text, the reader is introduced to the Aegean Bronze Age, starting ca. 3000 BC, the so-called "Dark Age" (Early Iron Age), and finally the Archaic period. A historian by training, Finley is clearly more at home with the Archaic period than the Bronze Age, a [...]


  • Mary

    I suspect if you left out all the detailed descriptions of site surveys and pottery fragments in other books on the ancient world, you'd end up with a book about this size: ~140 pages providing an overview of Greek and pre-Greek Aegean cultures.One possible issue for the lay reader is that Finley's interpretation may not agree with that of other scholars. (The thing I remember offhand is that the volcanic explosion of Thera had nothing to do with the end of Minoan civilization.) But this book wa [...]


  • Katrin

    This was a rather quick lecture about archaic Greece. I liked that questions were raised who lived first on Greek soil and who the "greek" settlers were and where they came from. The book stayed specific on a few topics and did not thrive to explain the two ages more profoundly. I was thus left wanting more information this book could not give. Still it was a good read with interesting ideas and thoughts.


  • Michael Anderson

    Essential tool for understanding Greek pre-history.


  • Al

    Small book which gives a very brief overview of the Bronze Age. Some good information on Knossos and the poalace culture of Mycenae.


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  • [PDF] ✓ Free Read ✓ Early Greece: The Bronze and Archaic Ages : by Moses I. Finley ↠
    216 Moses I. Finley
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Free Read ✓ Early Greece: The Bronze and Archaic Ages : by Moses I. Finley ↠
    Posted by:Moses I. Finley
    Published :2019-09-16T00:26:54+00:00