[PDF] ✓ Unlimited ✓ My Son, My Son : by Howard Spring ↠

By Howard Spring | Comments: ( 967 ) | Date: ( Dec 12, 2019 )

The story of William Essex, who rose from humble beginnings to become a successful dramatist and novelist, and his friend Dermot O Riordon, a fervent Irish patriot and founder of a great London furnishing house and their sons, Oliver Essex and Rory O Riordon Plus some other assorted characters, from old Mr Moscrop and his daughter Nellie, and Maeve O Riordon Those boysThe story of William Essex, who rose from humble beginnings to become a successful dramatist and novelist, and his friend Dermot O Riordon, a fervent Irish patriot and founder of a great London furnishing house and their sons, Oliver Essex and Rory O Riordon Plus some other assorted characters, from old Mr Moscrop and his daughter Nellie, and Maeve O Riordon Those boys grow up in friendship, but the passing years create circumstances that divide them as their fathers learn the hard way that sons do not always develop the way a parent might wish.


  • Title: My Son, My Son
  • Author: Howard Spring
  • ISBN: 9780006155799
  • Page: 374
  • Format: Hardcover

About Author:

Howard Spring

HOWARD SPRING was an immensely popular and successful writer, who enjoyed a large following of readers from the 1940s to the 1960s and though, since his death in 1965, he has become rather neglected, his books are still worth seeking out for their terrific storytelling and the quality of the writing He was certainly painstaking and professional in his approach Every morning he would shut himself in his study and write one thousand words, steadily building up to novels of around one hundred and fifty thousand words He rarely made major alterations to his writings all completed with a dip in pen Howard Spring started out as a journalist, but from 1934 produced a series of best selling novels, the most successful of which were My Son My Son and Fame is the Spur He was born in Cardiff in 1889 in humble circumstances, one of nine children and the son of a jobbing gardener who died while Howard was still at school He left school at the age of 12 to begin work as an errand boy, later becoming an office boy at a firm of accountants in Cardiff Docks, and then a messenger at the South Wales Daily News Spring was keen to train as a reporter, and was largely self taught he spent his leisure time learning shorthand and taking evening classes, where he studied English, French, Latin, mathematics and history He mastered English grammar by studying a book on the subject by William Cobbett He worked his way up to become a reporter on the South Wales Daily News, and then in 1911 he joined the Yorkshire Observer in Bradford By 1915 he was on the Manchester Guardian proof that he was a young man with much talent Soon afterwards he was called up for the Army Service Corps, where he served as a shorthand typist After the war, he returned to the paper in Manchester and worked as a reporter on a paper that allowed journalists to write and express themselves In 1931, after reporting on a political meeting at which Lord Beaverbrook was the speaker, Beaverbrook was so impressed by Spring s piece he described the man as a pedlar of dreams that he arranged for Spring to be offered a post with the Evening Standard in London, where he eventually became a book reviewer a successor to Arnold Bennett and J.B Priestley At the same time, Spring was developing his ambition to become a full time writer He thought he could do a lot better than many of the so called authors whose books he was asked to review His first book, Darkie and Co, came out in 1932 in this period he wrote a number of children s books for his sons , followed by his first novel, Shabby Tiger September 1934 and a sequel, Rachel Rosing 1935 His first major success came in February 1938 with My Son, My Son originally titled O Absalom, but, happily, changed when William Faulkner used a similar title in the United States , and in 1939 he was able to move to Cornwall to become a full time writer he and his wife, Marion, eventually settled at The White Cottage in Fenwick Road, where they remained for the rest of their married life In 1940, his best known work, Fame is the Spur, the story of a Labour leader s rise to power, was published This is without doubt a superb novel, and probably the one book by Spring that is still being read than 40 years after his death.During the war years Spring wrote two other novels, Hard Facts 1944 and Dunkerley s 1946 , and, subsequently he published There is No Armour 1948 , The Houses in Between 1951 , A Sunset Touch 1953 , These Lovers Fled Away 1955 , Time and the Hour 1957 , All The Day Long 1959 and I Met a Lady 1961 Spring also produced three volumes of autobiography Heaven Lies About Us 1939 , In the Meantime 1942 and And Another Thing 1946 which were later published in one volume as The Autobiography 1972 His last book was Winds of the Day 1964.It is relevant to note that many of his books had Manchester settings, which led to him being referred to as The Manchester Man , and



Comments My Son, My Son

  • Rebecca Foster

    (4.5) This is the second gem I’ve read from the new Apollo reprint series, after Josephine Johnson’s Now in November. It opens in working-class Manchester in the 1870s and stretches through the aftermath of World War I. Like a Dickensian urchin, William Essex escapes his humble situation thanks to a kind benefactor and becomes a writer. His best friend is Dermot O’Riorden, a fervid Irish Republican. William’s and Dermot’s are roughly parallel tracks. Their sons’ lives, however, are a [...]


  • Dorcas

    If I was to sum this book up in one sentence it would be, To a large extent, for good or bad, we are a product of our upbringing.William and Dermont are two close friends who plan and plot and ultimately live their lives through their two sons, Oliver and Rory. William is a man who lived a hardscrabble life but pulled himself up by his bootstaps to become a successful novelist. He determines to never let his son lack a thing. He must have everything money can buy and become an even greater man t [...]


  • Margaret

    I read it around my sixteen years. I adored it back then. And the thing is that thirty five years after my first reading, I still remember it. But I want to reread it! I wonder how I I am cgoing to evaluate it now


  • Helena R-D

    I bought it due to the book design catching my eye and then by the blurb on the back. I had this book sitting on my shelf for a while until I finally picked it up, intending to just read a chunk of it and save the rest for later.I read it all in one sitting, so enthralled I was by the straight forward and somewhat soapy saga of two friends who end up raising two sons that for better or for worse end up twisting their father's legacies for them.It can get melodramatic at places and the ending, de [...]


  • Barbara

    I read this for the first time when I was a teenager, and have re-read it several times since. I am now on a project of reading all of Howard Spring's novels in chronological order, and this was his third - and it is a masterpiece, a leap above the first two. The writing is impeccable and the settings and characters leap out of the page under his treatment. It is - as always - written with love and compassion for the people he is writing about, and with wisdom and sorrow for the inevitable dashi [...]


  • Sally

    An absolute blockbuster of a novel, narrated by author William Essex. Recalling his childhood as the unwanted son of a Manchester washerwoman, he remembers too his early – and lifelong – burning ambition to become rich.While in lodgings he becomes friends with Dermot, a gifted carpenter with strong patriotic feelings for the Irish, suffering under English rule. And as the narrative follows the personal and professional lives of the two men, Essex describes a conversation they have on the bir [...]


  • Peter

    I became obsessed with books popular during the Great Depression after I heard a story on NPR about books from then. I found this at the local library from the first edition.I made my way though the yellowed pages that were falling off the binding. The book was just amazing! From the writing perspective I got lost in the time periods that the book covered. Howard Springs writings made me feel as if I was there, in England during WWI; made me feel as if I had lived before electric; made me feel a [...]


  • Keith

    I cannot speak too highly of this wonderful novel, and I would urge any of my friends who have not discovered it to seek it out. This and Fame Is The Spur are Howard Spring's best two novels. I first read My Son, My Son when I was about 13 or 14, and the impact it made was such that I could not wait to track down all the other Spring novels then available. His books are very readable, and they capture the life and times of a particular generation so well. It was a different world, then, and we n [...]


  • Zoey Hardy

    My son gave me this book he found at a used bookstore. He knew I'd love it because it had an inscription written it. It was dated Christmas, 1939. He knows I collect books like that. They fascinate me. But I'd never read anything by Howard Spring, and had no idea what it was about. I was hooked from the beginning. And just like someone else on here said, good or bad, you are the product of how you were raised. Great book that everyone should read. I'd have loved it as a teenager, and wish I'd kn [...]


  • Nick Duretta

    Melodramatic tale of a successful British novelist and playwright whose errant son causes him a lifetime of anguish, all told against the backdrop of war--specifically, the Irish rebellion of the early 20th century. Heavy on coincidences to underscore the book's themes, and I'm not certain if the first-person protagonist novelist is supposed to be sympathetic, but he's not; he marries a woman he doesn't love just to get her father's money, and ignores the love of his life although she's right un [...]


  • Evgenia Dimitriou

    Επικεντρώνεται στο πόσο μπορούν να απέχουν οι προσδοκίες ενός γονιού για το παιδί του από την πορεία που θα χαράξει το ίδιο το παιδί για τον εαυτό του και το πώς η αγάπη του γονιού για το παιδί μπορεί να παραμείνει ακλόνητη, ακόμη και ύστερα από αποτρόπαιες πράξεις του δεύτε [...]


  • Susanne McCarthy

    One of my all-time favourite books. William Essex, the narrator and central figure of the story, is not a particularly sympathetic character, but you can't help but feel for him as he drags himself up by his boot-straps, achieves everything he thought he wanted, only to see it all crumble to dust - there's something of the inevitability of a Greek tragedy in it. The closing sentence (I won't quote it, as it's a spoiler) must be one of the most poignant in literature


  • Susanne

    One of my all-time favourite books. William Essex, the narrator and central figure of the story, is not a particularly sympathetic character, but you can't help but feel for him as he drags himself up by his boot-straps, achieves everything he thought he wanted, only to see it all crumble to dust - there's something of the inevitability of a Greek tragedy in it. The closing sentence (I won't quote it, as it's a spoiler) must be one of the most poignant in literature.


  • Zoika Blat

    read this when I was REALLY young, found it in my grandma's house, and though i cannot recall much stuff from it, i still remember the excitement while reading it. i guess it's worth a revision.


  • Cathy McGough

    Beautifully written. I couldn't put it down. If you like Howard Spring, then you'll love this one. His characters are very rich, and make sure you read it with a box of tissues handy!


  • Clare

    Wonderful evocation of time and place. One of the most engrossing novels I have read.


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  • [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ✓ My Son, My Son : by Howard Spring ↠
    374 Howard Spring
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ✓ My Son, My Son : by Howard Spring ↠
    Posted by:Howard Spring
    Published :2019-09-26T04:32:57+00:00